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Happy birthday, Marine Corps! Here are 42 powerful pictures of the Corps through history

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    Semper Fi!

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    Created in 1798, the Marine Corps Band was called "The President's Own" by President Jefferson during his inaugural ball. Since then, the band has played at every presidential inauguration. Here's the band in 1893.

    Created in 1798, the Marine Corps Band was called "The President's Own" by President Jefferson during his inaugural ball. Since then, the band has played at every presidential inauguration. Here's the band in 1893.U.S. Marine Corps Photo

    In the early 1900s, Marine forces were active in China and in the Philippines. This photo, from 1907, shows Marines posing in front of the Great Sphinx in Egypt.

    In the early 1900s, Marine forces were active in China and in the Philippines. This photo, from 1907, shows Marines posing in front of the Great Sphinx in Egypt.U.S. Marine Corps Photo

    World War I was characterized by trench warfare and the use of poison gas. Mortars were useful in muddy trenches because a mortar round could be aimed to fall directly into trenches, unlike artillery shells. These Marines are posing with a German trench mortar captured in France in 1918.

    World War I was characterized by trench warfare and the use of poison gas. Mortars were useful in muddy trenches because a mortar round could be aimed to fall directly into trenches, unlike artillery shells. These Marines are posing with a German trench mortar captured in France in 1918.U.S. Marine Corps Photo

    Another picture from 1918 shows Marines in France with gas masks.

    Another picture from 1918 shows Marines in France with gas masks.US Marine Corps Photo

    Here, Marines are practicing how to carry a wounded comrade during combat training in western Germany circa 1918. About 2,400 Marines died in World War I.

    Here, Marines are practicing how to carry a wounded comrade during combat training in western Germany circa 1918. About 2,400 Marines died in World War I.U.S. Marine Corps Photo

    Experimental Marine Corps aviation began in conjunction with the Navy around 1919. This photo from 1930 shows a Marine flying a Grumman FF-2 Navy plane. Within a decade the Marines had their first aircraft wing, which is now based in Okinawa, Japan.

    Experimental Marine Corps aviation began in conjunction with the Navy around 1919. This photo from 1930 shows a Marine flying a Grumman FF-2 Navy plane. Within a decade the Marines had their first aircraft wing, which is now based in Okinawa, Japan.US Marine Corps Photo

    Japan's surprise attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 triggered America's entry into World War II. This photo shows a Marine holding a piece of shrapnel removed from his arm after the attack.

    Japan's surprise attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 triggered America's entry into World War II. This photo shows a Marine holding a piece of shrapnel removed from his arm after the attack.US Marine Corps Photo

    Marines on a landing barge take one last look at a "good-luck picture" of a Pin-Up girl in 1943 while approaching the Japanese-held Tarawa island.

    Marines on a landing barge take one last look at a "good-luck picture" of a Pin-Up girl in 1943 while approaching the Japanese-held Tarawa island.US Marine Corps photo

    In the months after Pearl Harbor, Japanese forces expanded throughout the western Pacific, prompting deployment of Marines to the tropical island of Guadalcanal. This 1943 photo shows two Marines waiting for “Chow Call,” or mealtime.

    In the months after Pearl Harbor, Japanese forces expanded throughout the western Pacific, prompting deployment of Marines to the tropical island of Guadalcanal. This 1943 photo shows two Marines waiting for “Chow Call,” or mealtime.U.S. Marine Corps Photo

    In this 1943 photo James Wrobel designs the insignia for Marine Fighter Squadron 312. The official Marine Corps emblem features an eagle, globe and anchor. The eagle represents readiness and precision. The globe represents the Corps' worldwide presence. The anchor reflects the Corps' naval heritage and its ability to access any coastline in the world.

    In this 1943 photo James Wrobel designs the insignia for Marine Fighter Squadron 312. The official Marine Corps emblem features an eagle, globe and anchor. The eagle represents readiness and precision. The globe represents the Corps' worldwide presence. The anchor reflects the Corps' naval heritage and its ability to access any coastline in the world.US Marine Corps photo

    Amphibious warfare is a hallmark of the Marine Corps, as shown in this 1944 photo of Marines landing on the Japanese island of Saipan during World War II.

    Amphibious warfare is a hallmark of the Marine Corps, as shown in this 1944 photo of Marines landing on the Japanese island of Saipan during World War II.US Marine Corps photo

    Surrounded by a sea of mud, Marines stationed in the South Pacific island of Bougainville haul ammunition to the front line.

    Surrounded by a sea of mud, Marines stationed in the South Pacific island of Bougainville haul ammunition to the front line.U.S. Marine Corps Photo

    Marines come to collect their letters from home while stationed in Bougainville.

    Marines come to collect their letters from home while stationed in Bougainville.US Marine Corps Photo

    Marines from the Navajo tribe used their native language to send coded radio transmissions to units overseas. Here are Navajo code talkers from 1943 whose delivery was said to be faster and more accurate than Morse Code. Intercepted Navajo codes were never successfully deciphered by the enemy.

    Marines from the Navajo tribe used their native language to send coded radio transmissions to units overseas. Here are Navajo code talkers from 1943 whose delivery was said to be faster and more accurate than Morse Code. Intercepted Navajo codes were never successfully deciphered by the enemy.  U.S. Marine Corps Photo

    Wearing hardly any protective gear, Marine artillerymen plug their ears after launching a 155mm Howitzer round in northern Iwo Jima.

    Wearing hardly any protective gear, Marine artillerymen plug their ears after launching a 155mm Howitzer round in northern Iwo Jima. U.S. Marine Corps Photo

    This 1944 photo shows a Navy corpsman giving a wounded Marine blood plasma on an island in the Pacific. Marines captured the island in 24 hours with help from the heaviest naval and air bombardment ever at that time.

    This 1944 photo shows a Navy corpsman giving a wounded Marine blood plasma on an island in the Pacific. Marines captured the island in 24 hours with help from the heaviest naval and air bombardment ever at that time.U.S. Marine Corps Photo

    Iwo Jima was prime real estate for Americans to launch air raids against Japan, but the island was heavily guarded by Japanese forces. Marines are seen here battling at the foot of Mount Suribachi.